"I’m almost never serious, and I’m always too serious. Too deep, too shallow. Too sensitive, too cold hearted. I’m like a collection of paradoxes."
Ferdinand de Saussure (via fearlessknightsandfairytales)
186

Israel sucks, pass it on.

30
3lm19:

today, monday the 29th of september, another incident in sydney - discriminatory attacks resulting from the terrorism raids that took place two weeks ago.

This happened today at Silverwater Park. Muslim hijabi mother physically attacked in front of her 2 children and her hijab ripped off. She was unconscious and the male perpetrators yelled at her “You F##### Muslims” and the proceeded to rip her hijab off. Two other men and a female bystander came to defend her but were attacked & punched by the perpetrators. Whilst the police covered the sister’s hair when they arrived because her hijab was torn off, they didnt arrest the perpetrators because witnesses at the scene stated that when they questioned the police why they were not arrested, their response was, “we are still investigating” This is despite witnesses informing them of what they saw. May Allah swt give her shifa, and her family patience, steadfastness, & justice. Thank you Team Australia

3lm19:

today, monday the 29th of september, another incident in sydney - discriminatory attacks resulting from the terrorism raids that took place two weeks ago.

This happened today at Silverwater Park. Muslim hijabi mother physically attacked in front of her 2 children and her hijab ripped off. She was unconscious and the male perpetrators yelled at her “You F##### Muslims” and the proceeded to rip her hijab off. Two other men and a female bystander came to defend her but were attacked & punched by the perpetrators. Whilst the police covered the sister’s hair when they arrived because her hijab was torn off, they didnt arrest the perpetrators because witnesses at the scene stated that when they questioned the police why they were not arrested, their response was, “we are still investigating” This is despite witnesses informing them of what they saw. May Allah swt give her shifa, and her family patience, steadfastness, & justice. Thank you Team Australia

146
"

Sometimes he’ll tell me about his college days, about an Afghanistan I have never known and very few people would believe ever existed.

"In the College of Engineering, there was this lecture hall, with seats for 1,000 students," his says as eyes begin to get bigger. "At the end of the lecture, the seats would move. The whole auditorium would shift as you spun along the diameter. The engineering of the building itself was very interesting." He continues to describe the construction details, then sighs. "I wonder if it’s still around?"

There is a pause. For 25 years I have tried to fill that silence, but I have never quite figured out what to say. I guess silence goes best there. He is the next one to speak. “You see, even your old-aged father was once part of something important.”

When he says things like that I want to scream. I don’t want to believe that the years can beat away at you like that. I don’t want to know that if enough time passes, you begin to question what was real or who you are. I am unconcerned with what the world thinks of him, but it is devastating to know that he at times thinks less of himself.

We are the same, but we are separated. People don’t see him in me. I wish they would. I walk in with a doctor’s white coat or a suit or my Berkeley sweatshirt and jeans. High heels or sneakers, it doesn’t matter, people always seem impressed with me. “Pediatrician, eh?” they say. “Well, good for you.”

I wonder what people see when they look at him. They don’t see what I see in his smile. Perhaps they see a brown man with a thick accent; perhaps they think, another immigrant cabdriver. Or perhaps it is much worse: Maybe he is a profile-matched terrorist, aligned with some axis of evil. “Another Abd-ool f——-g foreigner,” I once heard someone say.

Sometimes the worst things are not what people say to your face or what they say at all, it is the things that are assumed. I am in line at the grocery store, studying at a cafe, on a plane flying somewhere.

"Her English is excellent; she must have grown up here," I hear a lady whisper. "But why on earth does she wear that thing on her head?"

"Oh, that’s not her fault," someone replies. "Her father probably forces her to wear that."

I am still searching for a quick, biting response to comments like that. The trouble is that things I’d like to say aren’t quick. So I say nothing. I want to take their hands and pull them home with me. Come, meet my father. Don’t look at the wrinkles; don’t look at the scars; don’t mind the hearing aid, or the thick accent. Don’t look at the world’s effect on him; look at his effect on the world. Come into my childhood and hear the lullabies, the warm hand on your shoulder on the worst of days, the silly jokes on mundane afternoons. Come meet the woman he has loved and respected his whole life; witness the confidence he has nurtured in his three daughters. Stay the night; hear his footsteps come in at midnight after a long day’s work. That sound in the middle of the night is his head bowing in prayer although he is exhausted. Granted, the wealth is gone and the legacy unknown, but look at what the bombs did not destroy. Now tell me, am I really oppressed? The question makes me want to laugh. Now tell me, is he really the oppressor? The question makes me want to cry.

At times, I want to throw it all away: the education, the opportunities, the potential. I want to slip into the passenger seat of his cab and say: This is who I am. If he is going to be labeled, then give me those labels too. If you are going to look down on him, than you might as well peer down on me as well. Close this gap. Erase this line. There is no differentiation here. Of all the things I am, of all the things I could ever be, I will never be prouder than to say that I am of him.

I am this cabdriver’s daughter.

"
"

there is two
types of tired,
I suppose

one is a dire need of sleep
the other is a dire need of peace

"
Mandeq Ahmed | blackorchidd (via lipstick-bullet)
"

Islam is commonly portrayed to be encouraging of terrorism. Let me put a twist on this perspective. During the first Gulf War, the United States intentionally destroyed the Iraqi water supply and then denied the Iraqis the importation of materials needed to rebuild the supply and purify the water. Thousands of Iraqi civilians were subsequently deprived of clean water, and waterborne illnesses became epidemic. According to the World Health Organization and UNICEF reports, over 1 million Iraqi people have died as a result of contaminated water, and over half were children younger than five years old.

According to Islamic law, poisoning the water supply is considered terrorism and killing civilians and children in warfare is strictly prohibited.

"

Sumbul Ali-Karamali - The Muslim Next Door: The Qur’an, the Media, and That Veil Thing 

Something to consider this 9/11: those crying “terrorist” in our government are the terrorists.

(via theroguefeminist)
"When you get, give. When you learn, teach."
muslimnproud:

vodkapussy:

peterfromtexas:

Heart surgeon after 23-hour (successful) lung heart transplantation. His assistant is sleeping in the corner

saw this in the national geographic best 100, this was my favourite

I can never not reblog this pic

muslimnproud:

vodkapussy:

peterfromtexas:

Heart surgeon after 23-hour (successful) lung heart transplantation. His assistant is sleeping in the corner

saw this in the national geographic best 100, this was my favourite

I can never not reblog this pic

"I want to build you a library."
My idea of a perfect pickup line (via peaceisofus)